Early Detection

The earlier a disease is discovered, the less chance there is of serious complications in the future. Early detection allows for better health management and increases the possibility of successful treatment; this can make all the difference.

There are several ways to practice early detection both through your physician and at home. Some of these practices include Diagnostic Imaging, Regular Screenings, Routine Physical Exams, and Self-Examination

One of the most important tools used in early detection is an ultrasound. This painless, non-invasive procedure allows your physician to capture real-time images from inside your body. By doing so they are able to identify any existing conditions or illnesses and promptly begin an appropriate course of treatment.

1

Diagnostic Imaging

2

Regular Screenings

3

Routine Physical Exams

4

Self-Examination

Early Detection

The earlier a disease is discovered, the less chance there is of serious complications in the future. Early detection allows for better health management and increases the possibility of successful treatment; this can make all the difference.

There are several ways to practice early detection both through your physician and at home. Some of these practices include Diagnostic Imaging, Regular Screenings, Routine Physical Exams, and Self-Examination

One of the most important tools used in early detection is an ultrasound. This painless, non-invasive procedure allows your physician to capture real-time images from inside your body. By doing so they are able to identify any existing conditions or illnesses and promptly begin an appropriate course of treatment.

1

Diagnostic Imaging

2

Regular Screenings

3

Routine Physical Exams

4

Self-Examination

Preventive Care

Preventive healthcare relates to the practice of detecting diseases and medical issues before they become severe. This practice allows both physicians and patients to be proactive in identifying any medical issues which may arise.  Preventive care can include immunization, lab tests, flu shots or regular check-ups. For example, physical examinations may be conducted to assess height, weight, vitals, medication lists, family health history, social environmental factors (such as smoking risks, diet and stress factors) and any other health concerns you may have.

ODI provides your physician with the means to conduct ultrasounds which accurately detect any illness which may develop into serious health issues. You can enjoy top-quality, reliable diagnostic testing conducted by our customer-friendly, certified technicians in the comfort and familiarity of your physician’s office. 

To see a full list of preventive ultrasound procedures click here:

Preventive Care Categories

What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition. It’s a bulge in the main artery that supplies blood to your belly, pelvis and legs. The aneurysm is a weak spot in the blood vessel wall, at risk for rupturing (breaking open) and causing a hemorrhage (severe bleeding). Sometimes people call AAA a stomach aneurysm.

How are they diagnosed?

Since AAAs don’t usually cause symptoms, healthcare providers often diagnose unruptured AAAs when they’re performing exams or tests for other health conditions. The following imaging exams may reveal an AAA:

Abdominal ultrasound: An ultrasound is a quick, painless test that uses sound waves to create real-time images of the inside of your belly. Your healthcare provider may be able to see an aneurysm on an abdominal ultrasound.

Computed tomography angiography (CTA): Your healthcare provider may do a CTA if they see an aneurysm on your ultrasound. You receive an injection of a contrast dye before a CT scan. Angiography helps your provider see the exact location, size and severity of the aneurysm

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What is Coronary Artery Disease?

Coronary artery disease is a narrowing or blockage of your coronary arteries usually caused by the buildup of fatty material called plaque. Coronary artery disease is also called coronary heart disease, ischemic heart disease and heart disease.

How is Coronary Artery Disease diagnosed?

First, unless your condition is an emergency (you’re having a heart attack or stroke), your cardiologist (heart doctor) will ask you about your symptoms, take your medical history, review your risk factors and perform a physical exam.

Some diagnostic tests may include:

Coronary calcium scan: This test measures the amount of calcium in the walls of your coronary arteries, which can be a sign of atherosclerosis.

Echocardiogram: This test uses sound waves to see how well the structures of your heart are working and the overall function of your heart.

Nuclear imaging: This test produces images of the heart after administering a radioactive tracer.

Computed tomography angiogram: Uses CT and contrast dye to view 3D pictures of the moving heart and detect blockages in the coronary arteries.

For more information on CAD click here:

What is diabetes?

Diabetes happens when your body isn’t able to take up sugar (glucose) into its cells and use it for energy. This results in a build up of extra sugar in your bloodstream. Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to serious consequences, causing damage to a wide range of your body’s organs and tissues – including your heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves.

How common is diabetes?

Some 34.2 million people of all ages – about 1 in 10 – have diabetes in the U.S. Some 7.3 million adults aged 18 and older (about 1 in 5) are unaware that they have diabetes (just under 3% of all U.S. adults). The number of people who are diagnosed with diabetes increases with age. More than 26% of adults age 65 and older (about 1 in 4) have diabetes.

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What is heart disease?

Cardiovascular disease (heart disease) refers to a group of diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels of your body. These diseases can affect one or many parts of your heart and /or blood vessels. A person may be symptomatic (physically experience the disease) or be asymptomatic (not feel anything at all).

Heart disease includes heart or blood vessel problems of these types:

  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Heart valve disease
  • Narrowing of the blood vessels with plaque
  • Heart squeezing and relaxation difficulties
  • Heart and blood vessel problems that you’re born with
  • Problems with your heart’s outer lining

What tests might I have for heart disease?

Some common tests to diagnose cardiovascular disease include:

Electrocardiogram (EKG) – records the electrical activity in your heart.

Echocardiogram – uses sound waves to create an image of your heartbeat and blood flow.

Cardiac CT – uses X-rays to create images of your heart and blood vessels.

Cardiac MRI – uses magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart.

Stress Tests – use different ways to stress the heart in a controlled way (exercise or medications) to determine how your heart responds through EKGs and/or images.

For more information on Heart Disease click here:

What is high blood pressure (hypertension)?

Blood pressure is the measurement of the pressure or force of blood pushing against blood vessel walls. When you have hypertension (high blood pressure), it means the pressure against the blood vessel walls in your body is consistently too high. High blood pressure is often called the “silent killer” because you may not be aware that anything is wrong, but the damage is still occurring within your body.

Your blood pressure reading has two numbers. The top number is the systolic blood pressure, which measures the pressure on the blood vessel walls when your heart beats or contracts. The bottom number is the diastolic blood pressure, which measures the pressure on your blood vessels between beats when your heart is relaxing. For example, a blood pressure of 110/70 is within the normal range, but a blood pressure of 135/85 is stage 1 (mild) hypertension, and so on (see table).

Category

Blood Pressure

Normal

Under 130/80 mmHg

Stage I Hypertension (mild)

130-139/OR diastolic between 80-89 mmHg

Stage 2 Hypertension (moderate)

140/90 mmHg or higher

Hypertensive Crisis (get emergency care)

180/120 mmHg or higher

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What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that your body needs for good health, but in the right amounts. Unhealthy levels of cholesterol can lead to a condition called high blood cholesterol. (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NHLBI

If you haven’t had a recent cholesterol screening, be sure to get one on your calendar. Experts recommend getting a cholesterol panel at 20 years of age, and then every five years. If you have high risk factors for heart disease, your doctor may recommend a yearly check.

It is best to have a test called a “lipoprotein profile.” This blood test is done after fasting for nine to 12 hours and provides a snapshot of your total cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood).

Your goal should be:

  • Total cholesterol (a measure of HDL, LDL and other lipoproteins)
    • Less than 200 mg/dL
  • Triglycerides
    • Less than 150 mg/dL
  • LDL (Low-density lipoprotein)
    • Less than 130 mg/dL
    • Less than 100 mg/dL for those with heart or blood vessel disease and for those with diabetes or high total cholesterol
  • HDL (High-density lipoprotein)
    • Greater than 55 mg/dL (females)
    • Greater than 45 mg/dL (males)

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